July242014
pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 24, 1847:  Brigham Young Leads Mormon Pioneers to Utah’s Great Salt Lake
On this day in 1847, after 17 months of traveling, Mormon leader Brigham Young and 148 pioneers arrived in modern-day Utah.  Seeking refuge and religious and political freedom, Young and his followers began preparations in this remote location for the thousands of Mormon migrants to follow.
Find out what led to the “Great Mormon Migration” courtesy of American Experience here.
Photo: Brigham Young by Charles William Carter. Wikimedia Commons.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 24, 1847:  Brigham Young Leads Mormon Pioneers to Utah’s Great Salt Lake

On this day in 1847, after 17 months of traveling, Mormon leader Brigham Young and 148 pioneers arrived in modern-day Utah.  Seeking refuge and religious and political freedom, Young and his followers began preparations in this remote location for the thousands of Mormon migrants to follow.

Find out what led to the “Great Mormon Migration” courtesy of American Experience here.

Photo: Brigham Young by Charles William Carter. Wikimedia Commons.

July72014

only1likeher618:

#TodayInHistory: In 1942, Anne Frank and her family go into hiding in the “Secret Annex” above her father’s office in an Amsterdam warehouse.

Frank family takes refuge: http://fw.to/69Eb1kS

July52014

todayinhistory:

July 5th 1948: NHS launched

On this day in 1948, the National Health Service came into effect in the United Kingdom. Ideas for a nationalised health system had been around for decades before 1948, but it was not until then that they became a reality for British citizens. The Labour government of Clement Attlee, elected in 1945, were committed to the principles of the welfare state. They were greatly influenced by the 1942 Beveridge Report, which recommended social reform to tackle the five ‘Giant Evils’ of squalor, ignorance, want, idleness and disease. Thinkers around Britain thus came to see healthcare as a fundamental universal right, not a privilege held by a few. Working with these ideas, the government passed the National Health Service Act in 1946, which came into effect on July 5th 1948 and created the NHS in England and Wales (Scotland’s was created separately). The creation of the NHS led to universal health care in the United Kingdom, paid for through central taxation, ending the requirement that patients pay directly for their own healthcare. It radically restructured the British health care system, with the NHS taking control of the almost half a million hospital beds in England and Wales and placing almost all hospitals and staff under its jurisdiction. Despite ongoing debates over the efficiency, cost and structure of the NHS, it remains a central feature of the British welfare state. As seen with its celebration during the London 2012 Olympic Opening Ceremony, the NHS is a point of national pride for Britain. Indeed, according to a recent study, thanks to the NHS Britain has the best healthcare system out of eleven of the world’s wealthiest nations, with the United States in last place.

66 years ago today

June282014
9PM
antiquellulaby:

Tea Leaves, 1909 - William McGregor Paxton

antiquellulaby:

Tea Leaves, 1909 - William McGregor Paxton

(Source: antiquelullaby, via antiquedvintage)

8PM

todayinhistory:

June 28th 1914: Franz Ferdinand assassinated

On this day in 1914, 100 years ago, Archduke of Austria and heir to the throne Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie were assassinated in Sarajevo, the capital of Bosnia and Herzegovina. They were killed by Serbian nationalist Gavrilo Princip who was driven to action by Austria’s annexation of Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1908. An attempt to blow up the Archduke’s car failed earlier in the day and his assassins had given up until Princip saw his car later in the day and shot the two. His death triggered a chain of events which led to the First World War. Austria-Hungary, in retaliation, declared war on Serbia, which led to the Central Powers (including Germany) joining on Austria’s side, and the Allied powers like Britain and France joining on Serbia’s side. On this day 5 years later in 1919, the Treaty of Versailles was signed in Paris, thus officially ending the First World War. On the centenary of this momentous day, one which altered the course of world history, it is important to remember the sacrifices made by the over 16 million who died in the ensuing conflict. One hundred years on, it is not our place to glorify nor belittle what they died for, but to solemnly remember the devastating effect of war.

"Don’t die darling, live for our children"
- His dying words to his wife

June242014
cimetiere-chanson:

Billie Burke, 1900s

cimetiere-chanson:

Billie Burke, 1900s

(Source: flickr.com, via antiquedvintage)

June212014
historicaltimes:

Boston and Maine Railroad depot, Riley Plaza

historicaltimes:

Boston and Maine Railroad depot, Riley Plaza

June202014
fashionsfromhistory:

"Happiness" Dinner Dress
Lucile
Fall 1916
Philadelphia Museum of Art

fashionsfromhistory:

"Happiness" Dinner Dress

Lucile

Fall 1916

Philadelphia Museum of Art

June182014

todayinhistory:

June 18th 1940: Churchill’s ‘Finest Hour’ speech

On this day in 1940, the British Prime Minister Winston Churchill gave his famous 'Finest Hour' speech in the House of Commons. The speech came at the end of the Battle of France during World War Two, after France had fallen to the forces of Nazi Germany. In this speech, Churchill called for Britain to prepare for its role in defending the world from the Nazis; he called for people to make this ‘Darkest Hour’, after the fall of a key ally, into a ‘Finest Hour’. After making the speech to the Commons, Churchill recorded it to be broadcast to the British people over the radio.

"the Battle of France is over. I expect that the Battle of Britain is about to begin…Hitler knows that he will have to break us in this Island or lose the war. If we can stand up to him, all Europe may be free and the life of the world may move forward into broad, sunlit uplands. But if we fail, then the whole world, including the United States, including all that we have known and cared for, will sink into the abyss of a new Dark Age made more sinister, and perhaps more protracted, by the lights of perverted science. Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that, if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, ‘This was their finest hour.’

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